Care is the cornerstone of our practice

Call for more information: 949-215 9130
Mon-Fri: 8:00AM - 5:00PM
23591 El Toro Road, Suite 265
Lake Forest, California

949 215 9130

info@carelinehomecare.com

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Saturday - Sunday CLOSED

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Right Fit - How will you find the right caregiver for our loved one?

During the initial assessment, we take detailed notes about your loved one’s care needs, diagnosis, interests and social needs. We then review our caregiver-pool to find the person with matching skills, knowledge, abilities, personality and experience.

Replacing a Caregiver - What if I don’t like my caregiver?

If you or your family member is uncomfortable with the caregiver for any reason, let us know and we will refer another caregiver. Call the office and we will assist you.

Unavailable - What happens when the caregiver gets sick or not available?

On days when the caregiver is unavailable, we will make every effort to find a substitute who matches the needs of your loved one.

Client Hospitalized - What happens when the patient is admitted to the hospital?

We can help by providing a hospital sitter. During that time, our  caregiver will stay with the patient so you can get some rest. We can also assist with the transition to home when the client is discharged from the hospital to ensure that the discharge instructions of the doctor are followed.

Changes in Schedule - Can I make changes in the established schedule?

Yes. Whenever the caregiver is not needed, you may cancel a particular day or shift. Just notify to the office so we can arrange the schedule of the caregiver ahead of time, a 24-hour notice would be appropriate.

Contract - Do I have to sign a contract?

For your protection, we utilize a standard Service Agreement that outlines the terms and conditions. It states the provisions for engaging the caregiver, billing, and specifies any prohibitions. This is vital to ensure clear communication about the needs of your loved one and our role in servicing those needs.

Pet Care - We have a pet, what are the limitations of caregiver’s duties for our pet/s?

If the client has a pet, feeding the pet can be part of the caregivers duty, but it’s not a priority. The caregiver is not responsible for the health and safety of the pet(s). Walking the dog and picking up dog or cat litter is not a primary responsibility of the caregiver(s), especially if the client cannot be left alone. Client’s care is the priority and the primary responsibility of the caregiver is the client.

Meals - Do we have to provide meals to the caregiver/s while on duty?

If the schedule is live-in, the client or representative provides for the 3 meals of the caregiver/s. Usually the client will get a list of food supplies from the caregiver. The caregiver should provide a reasonable list. Another option is the reimbursement type. The caregiver will bring their own food and the client will be billed $15. per day as meals reimbursement included in the invoice.

Meal Breaks – What are the rules on meal breaks?

Caregivers must be allowed to eat their meals. A period of not more than 30 minutes is allocated whenever practical after working 5 hours. They are not allowed to leave the residence of the client to eat their meals. When the schedule is live-in, the caregiver has 3 meal breaks.

Mileage – If the caregivers use their own vehicle with our consent to do errands for the client, how much is the mileage reimbursement?

If the client wants the caregiver(s ) to use or drive the caregiver’s vehicle, the mileage reimbursement is fifty six $0.56 cents per mile counted from the client’s home to the destination and back to the house. This is based on the federal regulation on mileage reimbursement. If the federal rates go higher or lower, we will change the rate whatever is the current federal rate. The caregiver(s) will keep a record of the trips made. Common trips include runs to the grocery, pharmacy, restaurant, doctor appointments, laboratory visits and general outings.

Housekeeping – What are included in the caregivers housekeeping tasks?

Only “Light” housekeeping tasks. Cleaning the bed room of the client, bathroom of the client, dusting furniture, wiping counter tops, dishwasher, trash disposal, take out trash, washing clothes, folding clothes and putting them away, water the plants on idle hours, sweeping the floor. Under the law on personal attendants, housekeeping duties of caregivers are limited to 20% of the scheduled working time. Caregivers are not housekeepers. Their main responsibility is the care of the client. Light housekeeping are merely incidental to their duties as caregivers. They shouldn’t be suffered to do housekeeping chores when they are done with all the caring routine for the client. Other activities are encouraged during idle time like sorting the mail, reading for the client, doing activities with the client. Heavy housekeeping like washing the windows, getting down on their knees to scrub the carpet or floor is not included. Cleaning the garage or washing the client’s car are not normal tasks of caregivers. Waiting time is also discussed in another topic.

Driving – We prefer that the caregiver(s) drive our car (client’s vehicle) to do errands or take the client to his/her appointments, what are the requirements and regulations?

When the client or family wants prefers that the caregiver drive the client’s vehicle, the client or representative should sign a “Client Transport Waiver” form wherein the client certifies that he/she is allowing the caregiver to drive their car, that the car is properly insured and that the client will include the caregiver’s name in the vehicle insurance as an authorized driver. The client will not be charged mileage reimbursement when their vehicle is used by the caregiver for trips on behalf of the client.

Waiting Time – What is the rule on waiting time?

Waiting is part of the job of a caregiver. It is normal to have idle time when all the routine chores are done. Waiting time is working time even when the caregiver is watching TV with the client. The caregivers are willing, able and available to respond to the needs of the client whenever the client needs assistance. Caregivers are allowed to sit down when there’s nothing to do. They don’t have to do anything all the time. The caregivers should not be required to do housekeeping more than 20% of their time. Please read the FAQ on housekeeping.

Non Medical Service - What is the nature and scope of the caregiver’s services?

The caregiver service is a non-medical service. We do not perform nursing or medical services and procedure. Caregivers are not licensed professionals they are not authorized and not qualified to provide medical or nursing care.

In the event that a medical practice may be involved in the care of a specific client, please talk to a Care Manager prior to the start of care, we will be happy to recommend a specific provider or referral or a resolution to your concern.

The following is a list of medical services/procedures which are performed by skilled and licensed professionals only:

  • Interpret blood pressure, temperature, pulse and respiration readings. Exception: recording of the reading is allowed.
  • Inserting suppositories, any type of injections, perform insulin shots (blood glucose testing) for diabetic patients. Tube feeding. Nasal gastric Tube (NG) or Gastronomy Tube (GT). Cutting of toe and finger nails. Suctioning. Sterile dressing changes and wound care treatment. Exception: first-aid treatment and / or application of ointment or cream.
  • Administration of enemas and douches. Insertion and irrigation and removal of in-dwelling catheters. Exception: Draining or emptying of the foley catheter bag subject to instructions from an appropriately skilled professional. Offer medical advice. Determine the stage of skin sores.

In the event that a medical practice may be involved in the care of a specific client, please talk to a Care Manager prior to the start of care, we will be happy to recommend a specific provider or referral or a resolution to your concern.

Emergencies – What if the client is having a medical emergency? What can the caregiver do?

If the client resides in a facility, the emergency procedure of the facility will be followed. In case the client lives in a private home, the caregiver in absence of a family member in the home will assess the situation and will make a determination to call 911 for emergency medical service.

Temporary Cancellation of Schedule – What if we don’t need the services of the caregiver for a particular date only because we have family members visiting and taking care of the client for a certain day, what are the regulations?

Whenever the family wants to cancel a particular shift schedule, the family should inform the caregiver at least 24 hours before the next schedule intended to be cancelled.

Client's Responsibilities – What are the responsibilities of the client or client’s representative when we sign up for caregiver services?

Agree to accept the caregiver/s without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. Treat caregivers with respect, dignity and consideration. Provide meals to the caregiver if the schedule is live-in or if the schedule exceeds 12 hours. To reimburse the caregiver for any out-of-pocket expenses incurred for the client in the performance of the service. Accept the consequences due to non-compliance for any treatment, care or assistance with activities of daily living. Provide safe and cooperative environment for care to be provided ( such as keeping dangerous pets confined, not smoking, putting weapons away, maintain a safe working environment free from any form of harassment) Pay for services on time. Allow the caregiver to make or accept calls to and from the agency whenever practical. Inform the caregiver if the client or any person in the home has a contagious disease.

Holiday – When the caregiver schedule falls on a holiday, is there additional charge?

Yes. All caregiver services performed on the following holidays will be billed at one and one half (1.5) times the regular rate; New Year’s day, Easter Sunday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.